How female sex tourists are exploiting African men

The scenery in Africa is great, that cannot be doubted. European women cannot get enough of it, but beyond the scenery, there is a new attraction drawing them in.
When they want to have a good time no one will know about back at home where they are held in high esteem, they come to Africa.
According to Africaexponent.com, older women from Europe and North America are now known to frequent African resorts in pursuit of ‘sexcapades’ as they are called. Young men stage-manage romantic affairs with the older European women and get to wine and dine with them. But who are these women? Are they not preying on poverty?
Female Sex Tourists…who are they?
In 2007, Reuters ran a story on the Kenyan sex tourism phenomenon detailing the story of one Bethan (then aged 56) and her best friend Allie (then aged 64) who were on their first holiday to Kenya. They said the country was “just full of big young boys who like us older girls”. Jake Grieves-Cook, then chairman of the Kenya Tourist Board answering a question about the perception of sex-tourism said, “It’s not evil but it’s certainly something we frown upon.”
Indeed there was reason to frown as the use of protection is not guaranteed yet HIV/AIDS is one of the big issues being tackled in African countries. Julia Davidson, a Nottingham University fellow’s findings were that some women shunned condoms and regarded them as too “businesslike” for their needs. So are all the women as old as Bethan and Allie? It would seem like it.
Writing for the Sydney Morning Herald, Matty Silver said women in particular wealthy, single and older white women plan holidays to have romance and sex with companions who make them feel special. These are broken women and those with urges they would be judged for in their societies.
Kenyan author of Sex Tourism in Africa, Kenya’s Booming Industry, Dr Wanjohi Kibicho says, “These women are lonely. Among all the women I talked to, there is an impression of something lacking at home, like their needs are not being met – not only sexual but also psychological and emotional support.”
Africa is their perfect get away. However, there is an inherent flaw in the evaluation of the practice. Male sex tourism has for long been labelled as exploitation but very rarely is that said for female sex tourism. What causes those double standards?
A case of double standards
In the 2012 film, Paradise: Love the Austrian director Ulrich Seidl gave everyone what W24 called “a candid look into the world of sex tourism”.
The protagonist is an overweight woman who comes to Kenya’s Mombasa where she has casual sex with buff young locals and spends money “left right and centre. Often on a family member who suddenly comes down with some sort of ailment”.
These convenient illnesses are most likely staged to siphon out even more money. The W24 publication interestingly then says, “In the end you’re left wondering, who’s exploiting whom?”
This immediately exposes the double standards culture that almost always calls out men but conveniently leaves out women engaging in the same practice. Surely gender equality should not gag people from calling a spade a spade.
Male sex tourism has for long been regarded as exploitative behaviour but somehow the story changes when it comes to the female version of the same trade. The ladies cover their tracks by claiming they are not buying sex but they are helping out the young men financially.
In her clichéd defence, Reuters’ interviewee, Bethan said, “It is a social arrangement. I buy him a nice shirt and we go out for dinner. For as long as he stays with me he doesn’t pay for anything, and I what I want – a good time. How is that different from a man buying a young girl dinner?”
However, Julie Bindel, a political activist and founder of Justice for Women advises the world not to buy into these women’s delusions. She says, “The exploitation endemic in prostitution does not disappear when women are the buyers.”
Why sugar-coat it? These women are coming to Africa to buy sex and the moment they do, they engage in prostitution (however they may try to sanctify it as a mutually beneficial activity). Female sex tourism is the expression of racial and economic dominance. This is as Nottingham University’s Davidson said, a return to the colonial past where white women were “served, serviced, and pampered by black minions”.
A Canadian woman interviewed by Bindel unwittingly exposed the exploitative nature of the trade though she had denied it being prostitution. She said, “If he doesn’t perform, he doesn’t get to eat. End of story.” This starts to sound like slave-driver rhetoric.
Whatever diplomatic arrangement of words they may use to support themselves, the female sex tourists are exploitative and should be called out for their unwholesome fetishes. It is not love they come looking for, they are here for the sex and for the dominance.

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Deserted treasure: ironies in Malawi’s tourism crusade

A country that is ranking tourism among its top-most priorities in economic crusade is ignoring cultural heritage sites that could turn things around, ALICK PONJE writes.
It takes a good one-and-a-half hours to reach the stunning cluster of Mangochi Hills from the stony base that is accessed through a bumpy road stretching from Majoni Trading Centre along the Mangochi-Chiponde Road.
Once on the summit, the trouble of ascending through rocky footpaths, parrying away irritating fruit flies and fungus gnats and dodging overhanging tree branches, becomes worthwhile.
The view is breath-taking. Rocks of various shapes and sizes, with mosses and white and yellow lichens growing on them, are all over, their striking appearance propped up by the green flora on the hills and shadows of rows of thin clouds lining the sky above.
“This place has been like this since time immemorial. Its beauty has survived through generations,” a brawny tour guide, who takes us to the stunning features, says.
He has accompanied to the site only a few local and foreign holidaymakers in his career spanning over 20 years despite that the place surpasses several others in uniqueness.
Around, butterflies of different shapes and colours, birds of different sizes and plumage and all manner of rodents, abound.
And there is more.
“Mangochi Hills has a unique and rich history. It is unfortunate that many people have never been here. Most don’t even know it exists,” the tour guide states, pointing at a stone barricade that has stood for over a century.
It is tall and wide, with holes through which bullets were reportedly being fired during the colonial era. The site was also turned into a military base for colonial soldiers, according to history accounts.
At that time, the main administration centre for the lakeshore district was high up there after the British had defeated Chief Jalasi who was notoriously known for slave trade.
It is a significant spot in Malawi’s history.
“But it is not sufficiently treasured. It would bring a lot of tourism revenue if it was properly taken care of and could be easily accessed,” Rodrick James, of Majoni Trading Centre, says.
He reckons that there was a time many locals from his village could go up the hills to marvel at the ruins whose story, he says, is not appropriately told.
“We have heard about the Zimbabwe Ruins because that country makes sure we know it. I doubt if they know that we have equally amazing features here,” he says.
The spectacular derelict fortress at Mangochi Hills and the still-standing structures which were offices and colonial government workers’ houses also tell a story of antique architectural prowess.
Perhaps, there is something to learn from them.
Lake Malawi Museum assistant curator, Mayamiko Chasuluka, whose institution selects, organises and looks after works of art and other historical features, also waxes lyrical about the ruins on Mangochi Hills which he says should be visited by anyone willing to appreciate the history of slave trade.
“They have a lot to say about slave trade. It is one place in Malawi where evidence of the trade is so clear. It was happening, of course, elsewhere such as Karonga and Nkhotakota,” Chasuluka says.
The soft-spoken curator concedes that the site has not been optimally publicised for more people to visit it despite that it is famous in history books.
Chasuluka, however, recalls that some foreign tourists, mostly Europeans, do visit the place which is also surrounded by dense, but untended, groves.
“It needs to be popularised so that more people should be visiting it,” he says expectantly.
But the popularising of the ruins might not be enough as accessing them is another big challenge which cannot be overcome by the faint-hearted.
The situation is not even better with Chikala Hills in Machinga which are not easy to access. They have unique natural earth walls and compartments which locals in a nearby village, Chindenga, claim once had some mystifying elements attached to them.
Around the outcrops, a cool breeze gently rocks thin trees and grass—a seemingly perfect place to quiet the dragons of worry and fear.
“This place has a unique history,” Charles Austin, a resident of Chindenga Village, a cropped expanse at the foot of the range of hills, explains. “A lot of strange things, we are told, used to happen here.”
Apparently, many decades ago, bells could toll from the touristy bluffs, their sharp sounds echoing through the villages below, inviting locals and visitors to worship.
Accounts from older residents of Chindenga Village further say doves could also be seen flying around the outliers, perching on the columns and sometimes on trees around the place.
“There were a lot of trees at this place not long ago. Maybe, because of changes in climatic conditions, most of them have died,” Austin claims.
He corroborates sentiments of those who advance that, long ago, people could not come closer to the protrusions but could only stop a good distance away and kneel in worship and supplication at the toll of the bells which no one has apparently ever seen.
“That no longer happens. Something should have been erected here to explain its history so that tourists can understand it. A few of them visit it. The poor state of the path to this site scares tourists away,” he explains.
Our excursion to the place confirms such sentiments. Even our pathfinder does not have it easy.
We abandon a few earth roads after discovering dead ends before exploring bushy footpaths snaking through stony stretches to the hilltops.
Perhaps, the place would not necessarily need big tourist courts, but just properly managed spots in the jungle teeming with the naturalness of life.
With a proper road, something that is starkly lacking in many tourist attraction sites, holidaymakers would be going to Chikala Hills in busloads of affinity groups that have found the lake a little too monotonous and would like to marvel at something new.
Now it lies almost abandoned with the stunning features still refusing to disappear with time.
Yet, the government is apparently taking tourism as something that can revamp Malawi’s struggling economy as also reflected in Malawi Growth Development Strategy III.
Cultural tourism, which would be best explored and bolstered through the sustenance of sites such as the Chikala outcrops and Mangochi Hills ruins, is said to be an important component to give the larger sector a facelift.
“But it seems authorities do not care at call. How do you neglect a beautiful site like the Chikala outcrops when it is clear that they are unique? A few local and foreign tourists that have been there have massively praised the place,” another resident of Chindenga Village, Alfred Sinoya, says.
He bemoans the challenges that locals from his village also face in accessing the rocky outcrops that stretch over a radius of about a kilometre with different groves and compartments.
It is a few kilometres away, but the craggy footpaths also block many from nearby villages to visit it and, perhaps, lead the way.
“There are people living at the base of the hills who have never been to the outcrops because it is not easy to reach them. If locals here cannot visit it, it becomes difficult to convince others to do it,” Sinoya says.
With reputable global entities like CNN Travel ranking Malawi as one of the best tourist destinations in the world, private players in the sector want the government to do more to capitalise on such positive rankings.
But the talk on revamping the sector is not new.
During a Tourism Street Carnival in Blantyre last month, Minister of Industry, Trade and Tourism, Henry Mussa, restated what his predecessors have said several times before—that the government is prioritising the sector as a driver of economic development.
He also appealed to service providers in the industry to make their rates affordable to attract domestic tourists.
Perhaps, the Domestic Marketing Strategy that the government has finalised drafting will have candid elements to boost a sector that has, otherwise, remained one of the most neglected despite its massive potential.
“Time has come that we, Malawians, and other people living in the country should develop interest in visiting our tourism destinations. We have big animals like elephants, lions, leopards and others in almost all game reserves,” Mussa said.
But unless monumental sites like the Mangochi Hills ruins and the Chikala outcrops are sufficiently popularised and are easily accessed, locals and private operators fear the tourism crusade will once again drift into oblivion.
This article firstly appeared in Malawi News of Times Group.

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8 Awesome Summer Activities in the Swiss Alps

Swiss Alps
Photo Credit: Unsplash

Many people, when they think about the Swiss Alps as a travel destination, don’t get past winter sports. But this is a mistake. The Swiss Alps is a popular vacation destination all year round. Well-known ski resorts such as Zermatt offer activities all year round, and if you go high enough, you can still ski on the Theodul Glacier.

In this post, we are going to discuss some other activities you can try if you plan to book a luxury Swiss cabin in the Swiss Alps this summer. If you want a mixture of sporting activities to keep you entertained, it’s a good idea to look at staying in or close to one of the main resort centers, but this isn’t obligatory. Whilst many of the big ski resorts offer different sports during the summer, you can stay in a bed & breakfast or even go camping and still have plenty of fun. And besides, sports aren’t the only activity on offer in the Swiss Alps during the summer months!

Here are a few more to whet your appetite.

1. Road Cycling

When it comes to cycling, there are few more exciting routes than traversing some of the many peaks made famous by the Tour de France. There are some ferocious climbs and corresponding descents in the Swiss Alps. You may not have the stamina to ascend the Tremola on the south side of the Gotthard Pass in one go. At 1,091 meters, it’s a challenging climb for all but the toughest cyclists. But the switchbacks are amazing, and you’ll want to take plenty of photos en-route. There is a nice restaurant at the top of the mountain, so at least you can refuel on Ovomaltine!

If the tough climbs of the Swiss Alps are too much for your legs, stick to flat routes along the valley floor and around the lakes. These are just as scenic, but not as tough on your quads.

2. Mountain Biking

Not all cyclists want to stick to smooth tarmac roads, which is just as well, as there are some amazing off-road cycle routes for mountain bikers. The Haute Route from Chamonix to Zermatt is one of the best-known mountain biking trails. It was originally used by alpine walkers but has since been adapted for mountain bikes. It is very technical in places and certainly not easy, but the breathtaking scenery more than makes up for the tough ascents and descents. Along the way, you will pass by the Matterhorn and Mont Blanc, taking in several high mountain passes and reaching altitudes of more than 2,500 meters. Make sure you switch on your Strava before you set off, as there is a lot of kudos to be claimed from completing such a challenging route.

If the Haute Route is too taxing, check out the bike trails in the Saas Valley. There are more than 70km of mountain bike trails, with sections for all abilities.

3. Walking and Hiking

It should go without saying that hiking and walking are both very popular in the Swiss Alps. You can hike from Zermatt up to the foot of the Matterhorn, descend the Gorner Glacier, and explore the region’s glacial lakes and mountain passes. Book a hiking vacation with a tour guide if you want to make the most of the mountain trails. That way you won’t get lost or end up taking a dangerous route.

Glacier hiking is something different, but it should never be attempted without a professional guide and suitable equipment. You can catch the cable car from Courmayeur and walk the glacier on Mont Blanc. The views are amazing. The Aletsch Glacier is also worth hiking.

4. Whitewater Rafting

Adrenaline junkies will want to try whitewater rafting in the Swiss Alps. There are rafting tours available from Interlaken and you can try your skills on class IV rapids. Courmayeur is a popular destination for whitewater rafting enthusiasts, but Lutschine is perhaps the most well-known.

5. Swimming

There are no shortage of cool Alpine lakes to swim in if you head to the Swiss Alps. Pack a picnic lunch and head up into the mountains on a hot day. Find a secluded lake and let the kids swim while you watch over them with a nice glass of wine in one hand and a sandwich in the other. There are many lovely mountain lakes close to Zermatt, so you can swim with the Matterhorn reflected in the water.

Kandersteg is one of the best locations for swimming in the Swiss Alps. This is a UNESCO World Heritage site and the scenery is outstanding. If you don’t want to swim, hire a boat and paddle up to the waterfall that feeds this beautiful mountain lake.

6. Fly Fishing

Fly fishing is a lot more relaxing than cycling, but no less fun. There are some wonderful lakes and streams in the Swiss Alps. The water is fresh and clear, which is perfect for fish species such as trout, char, and grayling. Some of the best fly fishing in the Swiss Alps can be found at Zermatt. With the mountains towering behind you, settle down for a peaceful day of fishing. Some local operators also offer fishing tours. You can fish on scenic privately-owned lakes adjacent to glaciers. What could be more perfect?

7. Play Golf

Switzerland isn’t known for its golf, but don’t let this dissuade you from taking your clubs along for the journey. There are two excellent 18-hole golf courses in the Swiss resort of Verbier, which should keep you entertained for a few days. You can practice your swing with the majestic Mont Blanc looming over you.

8. Painting

If you really want to take it easy, pack some sketchpads, pencils, and paints, and find a scenic spot to do some painting and drawing. There are few more scenic places than the Swiss Alps, so you won’t be short on inspiration.

The Swiss Alps are the perfect vacation destination for anyone. With luxury Swiss shepherd huts, chalets, ski cabins, and resort hotels, you can have a relaxing break and arrive home completely refreshed.

The post 8 Awesome Summer Activities in the Swiss Alps appeared first on The Maravi Post.

8 Awesome Summer Activities in the Swiss Alps

Swiss Alps
Photo Credit: Unsplash

Many people, when they think about the Swiss Alps as a travel destination, don’t get past winter sports. But this is a mistake. The Swiss Alps is a popular vacation destination all year round. Well-known ski resorts such as Zermatt offer activities all year round, and if you go high enough, you can still ski on the Theodul Glacier.

In this post, we are going to discuss some other activities you can try if you plan to book a luxury Swiss cabin in the Swiss Alps this summer. If you want a mixture of sporting activities to keep you entertained, it’s a good idea to look at staying in or close to one of the main resort centers, but this isn’t obligatory. Whilst many of the big ski resorts offer different sports during the summer, you can stay in a bed & breakfast or even go camping and still have plenty of fun. And besides, sports aren’t the only activity on offer in the Swiss Alps during the summer months!

Here are a few more to whet your appetite.

1. Road Cycling

When it comes to cycling, there are few more exciting routes than traversing some of the many peaks made famous by the Tour de France. There are some ferocious climbs and corresponding descents in the Swiss Alps. You may not have the stamina to ascend the Tremola on the south side of the Gotthard Pass in one go. At 1,091 meters, it’s a challenging climb for all but the toughest cyclists. But the switchbacks are amazing, and you’ll want to take plenty of photos en-route. There is a nice restaurant at the top of the mountain, so at least you can refuel on Ovomaltine!

If the tough climbs of the Swiss Alps are too much for your legs, stick to flat routes along the valley floor and around the lakes. These are just as scenic, but not as tough on your quads.

2. Mountain Biking

Not all cyclists want to stick to smooth tarmac roads, which is just as well, as there are some amazing off-road cycle routes for mountain bikers. The Haute Route from Chamonix to Zermatt is one of the best-known mountain biking trails. It was originally used by alpine walkers but has since been adapted for mountain bikes. It is very technical in places and certainly not easy, but the breathtaking scenery more than makes up for the tough ascents and descents. Along the way, you will pass by the Matterhorn and Mont Blanc, taking in several high mountain passes and reaching altitudes of more than 2,500 meters. Make sure you switch on your Strava before you set off, as there is a lot of kudos to be claimed from completing such a challenging route.

If the Haute Route is too taxing, check out the bike trails in the Saas Valley. There are more than 70km of mountain bike trails, with sections for all abilities.

3. Walking and Hiking

It should go without saying that hiking and walking are both very popular in the Swiss Alps. You can hike from Zermatt up to the foot of the Matterhorn, descend the Gorner Glacier, and explore the region’s glacial lakes and mountain passes. Book a hiking vacation with a tour guide if you want to make the most of the mountain trails. That way you won’t get lost or end up taking a dangerous route.

Glacier hiking is something different, but it should never be attempted without a professional guide and suitable equipment. You can catch the cable car from Courmayeur and walk the glacier on Mont Blanc. The views are amazing. The Aletsch Glacier is also worth hiking.

4. Whitewater Rafting

Adrenaline junkies will want to try whitewater rafting in the Swiss Alps. There are rafting tours available from Interlaken and you can try your skills on class IV rapids. Courmayeur is a popular destination for whitewater rafting enthusiasts, but Lutschine is perhaps the most well-known.

5. Swimming

There are no shortage of cool Alpine lakes to swim in if you head to the Swiss Alps. Pack a picnic lunch and head up into the mountains on a hot day. Find a secluded lake and let the kids swim while you watch over them with a nice glass of wine in one hand and a sandwich in the other. There are many lovely mountain lakes close to Zermatt, so you can swim with the Matterhorn reflected in the water.

Kandersteg is one of the best locations for swimming in the Swiss Alps. This is a UNESCO World Heritage site and the scenery is outstanding. If you don’t want to swim, hire a boat and paddle up to the waterfall that feeds this beautiful mountain lake.

6. Fly Fishing

Fly fishing is a lot more relaxing than cycling, but no less fun. There are some wonderful lakes and streams in the Swiss Alps. The water is fresh and clear, which is perfect for fish species such as trout, char, and grayling. Some of the best fly fishing in the Swiss Alps can be found at Zermatt. With the mountains towering behind you, settle down for a peaceful day of fishing. Some local operators also offer fishing tours. You can fish on scenic privately-owned lakes adjacent to glaciers. What could be more perfect?

7. Play Golf

Switzerland isn’t known for its golf, but don’t let this dissuade you from taking your clubs along for the journey. There are two excellent 18-hole golf courses in the Swiss resort of Verbier, which should keep you entertained for a few days. You can practice your swing with the majestic Mont Blanc looming over you.

8. Painting

If you really want to take it easy, pack some sketchpads, pencils, and paints, and find a scenic spot to do some painting and drawing. There are few more scenic places than the Swiss Alps, so you won’t be short on inspiration.

The Swiss Alps are the perfect vacation destination for anyone. With luxury Swiss shepherd huts, chalets, ski cabins, and resort hotels, you can have a relaxing break and arrive home completely refreshed.

The post 8 Awesome Summer Activities in the Swiss Alps appeared first on The Maravi Post.

Poor turnout mars 2018 Blantyre Arts Festival

 Blantyre Art Festival (BAF)
Blantyre Art Festival (BAF) which is organized in an effort to promote culture and local talent ends today.
By Alick Junior Sichali
Artist who performed at Blantyre Arts Festival (BAF) have expressed worries over poor turnout of people who participated at the event.
One of the actors from Youth Directors Council Theater (YCD), Mwai Kazandira, made the sentiments yesterday, Sunday during the closure of this year’s BAF.
Kazandira said the patronage was not good, a thing which he said it can affect them as they work in disseminating developmental information and that of people’s culture.
He said if artists in the country are not given the support needed it will pull back interest of upcoming youths who wants to join the industry.
“This year’s Blantyre Arts Festival was not that great, am saying this because the event lacked a good patronage. The audience was full with artist watching fellow artist performing at the stage a thing which is bad,” Kazandira said.
According to Kazandira organizers of the event need to put strategies which will make a lot of people to be interested to participate at the event.
The Actor said apart from working hard on advertising the event, there is a need of introducing a unique package each and every year which among others should involve audience participation.
“The organizers of this event need to work more on advertising; they should at least start 2 or 3 months advertising from the actual date of the event. Apart from that they should involve several partners who they can work with so that the goal of BAF is achieved,” explained Kazandira.
Spokesperson of BAF, Lukia Chikopa, said this year’s event was packed with interesting performances despite poor turnout.
Chikopa said they will be working on both positive and negative sides they have experienced at this year’s BAF and promised that next year’s event will be great.
She said each year they are making strides as they introduce new things at each year’s BAF.
“From 2009 where we had the first Blantyre Arts Festival to date we can say we are happy with how we have been moving. We have been recording positive things and also giving the people unique things, for instant this year we had workshops we artists were being trained,” Chikopa said.
She further said that BAF is committed in uplifting the welfare of artists and that they will continue supporting them so that they benefit from their talent and skills.
This year’s BAF was spiced up with performances by Black Missionaries, Makatumbe Band from Germany, Ethel Kamwendo Banda, Prince Chitsulo, Young Directors Council Theater (YCD), and Raphael Sitima among others.

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Sunbird Hotels and Resorts in Malawi Appoints AMG for UK & Ireland Representation

Malawi Tourism
Sunbird Hotels and Resorts Lake Malawi

Malawi’s leading hotel group Sunbird Hotels and Resorts www.sunbirdmalawi.com, has appointed AMG Ltd to provide representation, marketing and PR services in the UK & Ireland with immediate effect. This is the first time Sunbird Hotels and Resorts has had representation in the UK & Ireland.

Sunbird Hotels and Resorts is the largest hotel chain in Malawi and caters to leisure, business and MICE market. Its properties include: Sunbird Capital; Sunbird Mount Soche; Sunbird Lilongwe; Sunbird Mzuzu; Sunbird Livingstonia; Sunbird Nkopola; Sunbird Ku Chawe and Sunbird Thawale.

AMG Ltd’s scope of work includes business development, media and tour operator relationship management, agent training, educational trips and joint marketing campaigns.

Nadine Rankin, Joint CEO at AMG, says “With our representation roots, AMG has many years of experience representing hotels around the world and so we’re delighted to welcome Sunbird Hotels and Resorts into our portfolio of hotel clients. We are looking forward to working with travel agents to provide ongoing incentives and training programmes, as well as working closely with tour operator partners and in full alignment with the destination’s tourism strategy.”

This latest addition to AMG Ltd’s hotel portfolio comes after being appointed in recent months by: Coconut Court, Barbados; Hilton Rose Hall, Jamaica; Jewel Resorts, Jamaica; Playa Resorts, Jamaica, Dominican Republic and Mexico; Starfish Jolly Beach Resort, Antigua and The Reef Resorts, Mexico.

For more information and to set up a WTM appointment please email: Sangita@amgltd.biz

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Malawi Embassy in Washington DC finally gets New Immigration Officer to replace George Lamya

George Lamya Passport Officer at US Embassy being Recalled

The Malawi Embassy in Washington DC has sent a press release informing Malawians that they have filled the position of Immigration officer left vacant when they relieved George Lamya of his responsibilities due to austerity measures instigated by George Chaponda.

In an email made available to The Maravi Post addressed to All Malawian Diaspora Associations in the USA, , Ambassador Edward Y. Sawerengera said he was honored to inform Malawians that the Embassy has received a new Consular Officer and that the Embassy has resumed renewal of passports effective immediately
.

Diaspora Coference
Malawi Diaspora Conference 2019 in Washington DC

The arrival of the new  Consular Office coincides with the Diaspora Conference scheduled for next week end September 29th 2018. Ambassador Sawerengera is promising that those attending the conference can renew passports or apply for new passports.  “Consular Officer will be available at the Africa House on 29th September, 2018 during the Conference to process passport renewals”, said Sawerengera.

Requirements for the passport renewals are as follows:

  1. Copy of expired passport
  2. Two passport photographs (4.5 x 3.5 cm) with white background
  3. Copy of Birth certificate
  4. Marriage certificate (for married women)
  5. Police report (In case of lost or stolen passport)
  6. Copies of parents passport (In case of minor)
  7. $200.00 processing fee (In form of cash, money order or certified bank check)

The Malawi Embassy is encouraging many to travel and attend the Diaspora Conference and show support for this initiative that should be beneficial to Diaspora and our motherland.

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Malawi Govt on internet connections improvement to boast tourism

By Alick Junior Sichali
BLANTYRE-(MaraviPost)-The Malawi government through the ministry of trade and tourism in collaboration with the ministry of information says they are working together to resolve the problems of internet connections as to improve tourism industry.
Minister of industry, trade and tourism, Henry Mussa, made the remarks on Saturday at the 2018 Blantyre tourism street carnival.
The remarks by the minister follow concerns from tourist in the country saying the country does not have good internet connectivity.
But on Saturday, Mussa said government is aware of the problem and assured Malawians that they will soon start experiencing good internet connectivity.
“We aware of the problem of internet connections that on a number of occasion’s people who have visited the country have been complaining of, as government we are working on that and soon people will start enjoying good internet,” Mussa said.
The minister cited the fiber project as one way government has embarked on to improve internet connections in the country.
He said the fiber project which is expected to be done in all districts of the country once completed the issue of poor internet connection will be a history.
“As you aware that the ministry of information embarked on the fiber project, that project is expected to go into phase two where it will cover all the districts. As soon as it has been completed the issues of poor internet connections will be a history,” explained Mussa.
According to the minister government is working on strategies on how best people can have an easy access of places they want to visit on their phones and computers.
Mussa said in line with this year’s national tourism month theme ‘Tourism and the Digital Transformation’ there is a need of people to be able to book places using their phones and computers hence the need of good internet connection.
On the part of the main sponsor of the event Malawi Gaming Board, Davie Saeluzika, said they sponsored the event knowing the importance of tourism sector to the country’s economy.
Saeluzika urged Malawians to be the first to patronize in such events and also visit different beautiful places of the country.
“Malawi Gaming Board is pleased to be associated with this great event, as Malawians lets be the first to participate in these events  and to be the first ones to visit different beautiful places of the country ‘Tidziyamba ndife a Malawi,” Saeluzika said.
Each year on 27 September is world tourism day but Malawi designated the whole month of September as the national tourism month.
The 2018 national tourism month was launched  4thSeptember at the Lilongwe Wildlife Centre.

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Lions Return to Malawi’s Liwonde National Park as Majete’s Population Grows

Malawi Lions
Lions in boma in Liwonde National Park © Frank Weitzer

African Parks has completed a series of lion translocations as part of wider efforts to restore Malawi’s parks; and for the first time in 20 years, a population of the iconic predators has been re-established in Liwonde National Park.

African Parks partnered with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, the Dutch Government, the Lion Recovery Fund and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation to translocate twelve lions from South Africa to Malawi.

On the 22nd of August 2018, conservation non-profit African Parks, in partnership with the Department of National Parks and Wildlife (DNPW), and with support from the Dutch Government, the Lion Recovery Fund and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation, announced the completion of a series of lion translocations from South Africa to Malawi. Wild lions have been reintroduced to Liwonde National Park two decades after a breeding population was present. Seven lions from South Africa joined two males brought from Majete Wildlife Reserve in March to re-establish the species in the park. Their arrival also follows the recent reintroduction of cheetah to Liwonde in May 2017, as part of a wider initiative to restore predators to the region. This translocation also included introducing an additional five lions into Majete from South Africa to enhance genetic diversity of the founder population in the reserve, where the predators were also reintroduced by African Parks in 2012, years after being poached out. These latest introductions highlight the ongoing restoration of Malawi’s natural heritage by the Malawian Government and African Parks for the long-term benefit of the people of Malawi.

“We are immensely proud of the restoration of our country’s parks and are committed to ensuring the ongoing protection of these extraordinary national assets” said the Director of the Department of National Parks and Wildlife, Brighton Kumchedwa. “The reintroduction of lions and other emblematic species form a core part of this vision, enabling the rejuvenation of wildlife populations, enhancing tourism and socio-economic development, and contributing to the wellbeing of those living around the parks”.

In Liwonde, years of human-wildlife conflict and poaching eradicated resident predator populations, but, before bringing predators back, African Parks overhauled law enforcement to secure the park, constructed a robust perimeter fence, removed thousands of snare traps, established rigorous ranger patrols, and worked with local communities to prevent poaching and human-wildlife conflict. With infrastructure and security in place allowing a prey base to recover, African Parks began the process of reintroducing wildlife.

The latest translocation marks the return of an iconic predator to Liwonde but also represents a new chapter for Majete Wildlife Reserve. In addition to the seven lions sent to Liwonde from South Africa, five lions were introduced into Majete, bringing the reserve’s population up to 17 while ensuring greater genetic diversity. The new arrivals, fitted with tracking collars to facilitate daily monitoring, were released on Wednesday August 15th into the wider park from enclosed bomas which supported their adjustment and social bonding.

A century ago, Africa contained more than 200,000 wild lions but in recent decades, habitat loss, human-wildlife conflict and diminished prey have caused Africa’s lion population to plummet to just fewer than 20,000, eradicating them from up to 90% of their historical range. Lions are now extinct in 26 African countries, but Malawi has become a bright spot among efforts to conserve the species.

“Alongside Malawi’s Government and people, African Parks has shown what the pinnacle of lion recovery looks like,” said Dr. Jeffrey Parrish, Vice-President of the Wildlife Conservation Network, founder of the Lion Recovery Fund. “Rewilding Malawi’s parks and restoring this flagship predator to its past domain serves as a beacon of hope that we can indeed recover lions and their landscapes across Africa, with and for communities and economies.”

Predators serve an important ecological function. “Bringing back lions restores a key species that is critical to the healthy functioning of the natural system” explains Patricio Ndadzela, African Parks’ Deputy Director of Conservation, “Symbolic of the Malawian Government’s commitment to revitalising its parks and wildlife, the translocation also contributes to the establishment of a significant national predator population and to the development of sustainable tourism economies to promote local livelihoods and socio-economic growth”.

“Parks are the cornerstones of conservation and rewilding parks with their top predators makes a park complete,” said Justin Winters, Executive Director of the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation. “We are honored to support the bold actions of African Parks through the Lion Recovery Fund.”

African Parks has worked closely with the DNPW since assuming management of Majete in 2003. Since then, African Parks has transformed the reserve into a big five destination by overhauling law enforcement and repopulating Majete with more than 2,500 translocated animals, among them lions, rhinos and elephants. After its success restoring Majete, African Parks signed long-term management agreements with the Malawian Government for Liwonde National Park and Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve in 2015. The Dutch Postcode Lottery, the Wyss Foundation, WWF-Belgium, the People’s Postcode Lottery and Stichting Dioraphte have provided key multi-year support to African Parks for the overall management of these parks.

Source: MalawiTourism

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Malawi holds 2018 National Tourism month in September

Lake Malawi
Young Girl Water Skiing Lake Malawi

Lilongwe, August 27, 2018: Ministry of Industry, Trade and Tourism will launch the 2018 National Tourism Month in Lilongwe on September 4, 2018,

In a Press release issued in Lilongwe Friday by Director of Tourism, Isaac Katopola says tourism industry players, stakeholders and the public to get ready for the launch.

He indicated that launch would mark the beginning of raising awareness to the public, private and public sector decision makers on tourism contribution towards the socio-economic development of the country.

Prince Harry
File Photo: Prince Harry takes part in historic ‘500 Elephants’ Conservation Initiative in Malawi with African Parks

“Malawi as a country designated September as “National Tourism Month” as it falls in the month during which the United Nations World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) members states and the rest of the world join hands to commemorate World Tourism Day which falls on September 27, every year,” Katopola stated.

The Director said the 2018 World Tourism Day will be commemorated under the theme: Tourism and the Digital Transformation.”

He added that the theme focuses on how tourism could be used as a strategic tool that could nurture innovation and new technologies.

Katopola described UNWTO’s intention to make innovation a part of the solution towards marrying continued growth with a sustainable and responsible tourism sector.

Lake Of Stars
Malawi Lake of Stars’ treats youths to a rare innovative

In order to foster awareness of the importance of innovation and the digital transformation in the tourism industry, the Ministry jointly with industry players and key stakeholders will carry out the following activities during the tourism month as follows:

  1. Lilongwe Jazz Festival in Lilongwe Golf Club on August 31 to September 1, 2018.
  2. Umhlangano Wa Maseko Ngoni in Ntcheu on September 1, 2018.
  3. Official National Tourism Month Launch ceremony in Lilongwe on September 4, 2018.
  4. Ladies Summer Night Party at Sunbird Capital in Lilongwe on September 7, 2018.
  5. Chitenje Night at Sunbird Mount Soche in Blantyre on September 7, 2018.
  6. Sunbird Water sport Launch at Nkopola Lodge in Mangochi on September 8, 2018.
  7. Run 4 Reforestation in Zomba on September 8, 2018.
  8. Regional Street Carnival in Blantyre on September 15, 2018.
  9. Regional Workshop on Tourism and Digital Transformation in Nkhatabay on September 20, 2018.
  10. Launch of the Cultural Heritage Association on September 22, 2018.
  11. Official Commemoration of World Tourism Day on September 27,2018 to be presided over by Minister of Industry, Trade and Tourism, Henry Mussa at Bingu International Convention Centre (BICC) in Lilongwe where some entrepreneurs shall showcase their digital innovation for travel and tourism.
  12. Central Region Essay writing competitions.
  13. Central Region Primary School quiz.
  14. Lake of Stars Arts Festival at Kabumba Hotel in Salima from September 28 to 30, 2018.

For further information and clarifications  stakeholders are advised to contact the  Director of Tourism on cell phone number + 265 994 625626 and email: info@visitmalawi.mw

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